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Let It Come to Us All

Only Here till Friday

The Janus Hour

 

Let It Come to Us All

A bilingual collection published by Integral (Bucharest), January 2017.
 
Let It Come to Us All, cover © Stelian Bigan
 
The collection comprises 20 pages of poems and a cultural profile, all in English, and in Romanian translation (48pp in all). The translations are by Popescu Prize winner Prof Dr Lidia Vianu of the Universtity of Bucharest.
 
The poems are a mix of poems previously published in magazines, anthologies or online, and poems otherwise unpublished.
 
Cover text:
 
Penelope Shuttle described Anne Stewart’s first collection as “fearless, muscular, flexible, staunch”, quoting the Finnish Proverb ‘Better a bitter truth than a sweet lie’. In Dilys Wood’s review of her second collection, she refers to Stewart as an exceptional poet who has “forged a recognisable voice … instantly ‘there’ in tone, style, content and experimentation with approach and form.” In this new collection, she applies the same unflinching approach, but with a decidedly political bent, extending her range of enquiry beyond the personal to the ‘world-web’ (I don’t want to write ‘war’).
 
“The title is taken from a poem, For a Change, inspired by my niece, Joanne Stocks, honoured with a visit to Buckingham Palace in thanks for her work with, and fundraising work for, the St John Ambulance service, and who, in preparation for paramedic training, works with the Yorkshire Ambulance Service.”
 
Read poems:
 
For a Change
I don’t want to write ‘war’.
 
Buy a copy from the poetry p f online shop.
 
An illustrated version, also translated by Prof Dr Lidia Vianu, is published online by Contemporary Literature Press. Available as a free download here.

 

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Only Here till Friday

A bilingual collection published by Bibliotheca Universalis (Bucharest), published in April 2015 in English with Romanian translation, and in 2016, English with Spanish translation.
 
Only Here till Friday, cover image © Anne Stewart
 
The collection comprises 25 poems, a cultural profile, an abstract from Penelope Shuttle’s review of Anne’s work, in particular of The Janus Hour (review originally published in ARTEMISpoetry), and critical comment on Anne’s work from various sources, all in English and in Romanian translation. The book was produced by Daniel Dragomirescu (editor, Orizont Literar Contemporan / Contemporary Literary Horizon) and the translations are by Madalina Banucu, Alexandra-Diana Mircea and Izabela-Elvira Vate.
 
The title is taken from the poem Snow snow more cold lonely snow, winner of the Silver Wyvern Award (Poetry on the Lake, Italy, 2014).
 
Five of the poems included are taken from The Janus Hour. The others are from various publications (mainly magazines and anthologies) over the years or previously unpublished work.
 
Read poems:
1916
A bed is a lightbulb in the night sky
Perception as a Furry Thing
 
Though not primarily intended for UK distribution, copies are available from the poetry p f online shop: Eng/Rom and Eng/Sp.

 


 
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The Janus Hour

First collection The Janus Hour, Oversteps Books, 2010.
 
The Janus Hour, cover image © Martin Parker
 
Comments:
 
          “Anne Stewart’s poetry is characterised by a view of the world that is quizzical, appraising, unflinching yet non-judgemental: this is how things look from here, it says; take it or leave it. Her poems address, with the same deft lightness of touch, both uncomfortable truths about our time and the surreal in the everyday, achieving a rare consistency of expression without ever being predictable.”
 
          Jeremy Page, editor, The Frogmore Papers.
 
          “The Janus Hour is strong, resourceful and varied, dominated by its music and a sense of quest for survival, for the light behind the clouds. Mercurial, like a Fellini film.”
 
          Katherine Gallagher
 
          “Anne Stewart is a highly skilled poet whose poetry can be highly disturbing. Her sonnets, terza rima and other poems are beautifully wrought, yet her subject matter is very near the bone. Mothers, sisters, deaths in the family and a ‘list of cruelties’ are prominent in this book, which is essential reading for all interested in women’s poetry.”
 
          Merryn Williams, editor, The Interpreter’s House.
 
          “… For Anne Stewart writes like the lovechild of Dorothy Parker and Louis MacNeice. She possesses a wry and humane wit modulated by illuminating and synaesthestic insights that draw the reader in. If hers is a harsh enchantment, it is nonetheless true enchantment.”
 
          Penelope Shuttle, review in ARTEMISpoetry Issue 5.
 
Read poems:
Balance Sheet
More
Still Water, Orange, Apple, Tea
Take my Hand
There is no bread in the house
copies from the Oversteps Books website or from me the poetry p f online shop.

 


 
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